Leadership Outline

PREPARATION

Depending on the design of the Leadership workshop, the preparation could include:

  • Participants meetings with their supervisors;
  • Pre-reading material;
  • An e-meeting;
  • A pre-workshop questionnaire to tailor the workshop more closely to the needs of these particular participants.

The questionnaire would:

  • Surface best practices of what is working well;
  • Identify leadership/management challenges to address in the workshop;
  • Synthesize desired outcomes;
  • Provide advice to the facilitator.

CHALLENGES AND OUTCOMES

  • Identify the management/leadership challenges and issues to address during the training.
  • Agree on outcomes for the workshop.

LEADERSHIP:  FOCUS AND DIRECTION

  • Distinguish between management and leadership behaviours; identify the competencies required to be successful in both roles; and recognize growth opportunities.
  • Reflect on the type of leadership required of you by your organization, team and yourself.
  • Develop your own personal leadership vision to provide focus and a sense of direction and inspiration.
  • (When learning as a leadership group)  Develop a group leadership plan to implement between modules.

TRANSITION FROM PEER TO SUPERVISOR

  • Develop skills and strategies to make the transition from peer to supervisor more seamlessly by focusing on four key result areas:
    • Accept your new role;
    • Set clear boundaries;
    • Communicate;
    • Take action.

EFFECTIVE DELEGATION

  • Explore the benefits of sufficient, appropriate delegation and the consequences of not delegating sufficiently or appropriately.
  • Identify the obstacles to effective delegation; then develop strategies to overcome these obstacles.
  • Discover the components of accountability that works, including clear agreements, responsibility and personal empowerment.
  • Use a step-by-step approach to delegation (preparation – the interview – follow-up) for best performance.

LEADERSHIP FLEXIBILITY

Many believe that there is a best style of leadership, a right style, a worst and wrong style.  The truth is there is no best style.  The best style is the one that works for the readiness level of this employee for this task in this situation.

  • Identify the consequences of “over-supervision” and “under-supervision” for the leader, the followers, the team and the organization.
  • Use a methodology to determine the readiness level of each employee for the task at hand.
  • Discover your own leadership style preferences and your style flexibility strengths and weaknesses.
  • Adapt your leadership style to the immediate needs of the employee in each situation.

LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

  • Assess your strengths and weaknesses in the five leadership practices identified in the research of Kouzes and Posner:
    • Inspiring a Shared Vision;
    • Modeling the Way;
    • Enabling Other to Act;
    • Challenging the Process;
    • Encouraging the Heart.
      (This could be a self-assessment of 3600 feedback.)
  • Explore techniques and initiatives to improve each practice.
  • Develop a personal plan to improve each of the five practices in your team.

STATE, EXPECTATIONS AND SELF-FULFILLING PROPHECIES

  • Understand how leaders unconsciously communicate positive and negative expectations to employees; and how employees meet those expectations.
  • Manage four aspects of your approach to employees to ensure that you communicate positive expectations.
  • Gain and regain composure which affects leaders’ perceptions and reactions.
  • Identify and break through limiting expectations about yourself, your employees and what you can achieve as a leader.
  • Maintain friendly neutrality in the most difficult situations.

RAPPORT AND TRUST

  • Establish rapport and trust instantly.
  • Use verbal and nonverbal techniques to open, calm or motivate.

CREDIBILITY

  • Communicate credibility by demonstrating four qualities in any transaction; then cultivate them over time.

ACTIVE LISTENING

  • Use feedback, open questions and silence to build relationships and gather pertinent information.

ASSERTIVENESS

  • When you have to deliver bad news or deal with sensitive issues, do it skilfully.
  • Discover to what extent you choose to use your influence assertively, aggressively, passively or passive aggressively.
  • Adopt a more assertive approach progressively, over time.

READING PEOPLE AND ADAPTING I:  COMMUNICATION MODES

  • Discover to what extent you prefer the visual, auditory or kinesthetic modes in communication; and the serial or parallel way of mentally processing information.
  • Recognize and adapt your leadership approach to the preferred communication modes and mental processes of your employees.

CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK

  • Provide corrective feedback in a clear and respectful way, leaving the employee committed to the corrective action and motivated.

PERSUASION

  • Win employees over by framing messages in terms of their interests.
  • Win employees back once you have lost their commitment for any reason.
  • Sell your ideas by presenting them in a persuasive and compelling way.
  • Explore the fundamentals of persuasion.

MOTIVATION

  • Distinguish between what motivates employees and what only dissatisfies them (and why managers confuse them).
  • Discover the top 4 “universal” motivators; then, ensure that both you and your employees are regularly inspired by the universal motivators.